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2023lctgmeetingchats

This page last changed 2024.01.10 11:43 visits: 1 time today, 5 times yesterday, and 535 total times

Chat Messages during LCTG Meetings

These are a record of the chats that were passed during meetings in 2023. They have been edited to a small extent.
To find chats for a given day, for example July 19, 2023, search for datecode 20230719 (2023, month 07, day 19).

20231220

Potpourri

Videos on Feynman and Computing Pi

08:31:54 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Syncthing.
08:32:01 From tedpk to Everyone:
	Adam Adamandy Kochanski’s approximations of ´ π:
	reconstruction of the algorithm ∗
	Henryk Fuks´
	Department of Mathematics and Statistics,
	Brock University
	St. Catharines, Ontario L2S 3A1, Canada
	Toronto, Ontario M5T 3J1, Canada
	Email: hfuks@brocku.ca
	Abstract
	In his 1685 paper “Observationes cyclometricae” published in Acta Eruditorum, Adam
	Adamandy Kochanski presented an approximate ruler-and-compass construction for rectifi- ´
	cation of the circle. It is not generally known that the first part of this paper included an
	interesting sequence of rational approximations of π. Kochanski gave only a partial explana- ´
	tion of the algorithm used to produce these approximations, while promising to publish details
	at a later time, which has never happened. We reconstruct the complete algorithm and discuss
	some of its properties. We also argue that Kochanski was very close to discovery of continued ´
	fractions and convergents of π.
08:37:26 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Note:  Adam is NOT Ted’s older brother. ;)

return

20231213

Planning meeting

08:21:25 From tedpk to Everyone:
	Quantum Fields: The Real Building Blocks of the Universe - with David Tong  6,065,075 views  Feb 15, 2017
	According to our best theories of physics, the fundamental building blocks of matter are not particles, but continuous fluid-like substances known as 'quantum fields'. David Tong explains what we know about these fields, and how they fit into our understanding of the Universe. 
	
	David Tong is a professor of theoretical physics at Cambridge University, specialising in quantum field theory.https://youtu.be/zNVQfWC_evg?si=N0-udysPRZ4ZS4jT
08:25:09 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Brian Greene “World Science Festival”
08:27:59 From tedpk to Everyone:
	BBC The Entire Universe 2016
	7 years ago
	Eric Idle persuades Professor Brian Cox to present a lecture on the birth of the entire universe. Brian soon realises Eric is actually hosting a comedy and musical extravaganza.
	
	Aired December 26th 2016 BBC2. . https://dai.ly/x579m0o
08:38:53 From John Rudy to Everyone:
	https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbmNph6atAoGfqLoCL_duAg
08:41:31 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Newton and Pi on “Veritasium” (18 minutes) ~ https://youtu.be/gMlf1ELvRzc

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20231206

Hockney-Falco Thesis on the history of art

07:32:58 From Don Cooke to Everyone:
	There's camera obscura and camera lucida. My favorite employee, Peter Moeykens, has written an excellent iPhone app called "Camera Lucida". Alas, I'm an Android type and can't use it. (The "half-silvered mirror" device Harry's talking about is a camera lucida, not a camera obscura)
07:36:31 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Camera Lucida AR for Android  https://camera-lucida-ar.en.softonic.com/android
07:41:00 From Don Cooke to Everyone:
	I got a wonderful tour of Warsaw by a Polish friend who worked for a "cousin" company. He showed me the "Old Town" that had been so badly trashed by Hitler that during restoration they had to revert to paintings by Canaletto, who painted city portraits all over Europe in the 1700s, probably using a camera obscura.
08:23:17 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	Wall paintings from the Roman period showed three-dimensionality.
08:23:53 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	I saw this in paintings recovered from Pompeii.
08:23:53 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Mechanical devices have been used to create realistic art for centuries, maybe millennia. Perspective in particular was created using guides and other tools. And there were guide tools to help artists keep a steady hand when drawing lines.
08:28:18 From Don Cooke to Everyone:
	OMG, this has been fun! I have several tabs open to pursue. Thank you!
08:32:48 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Harry, do you have anything to say (now or in a future Potpourri) about M.C. Escher and/or Teller (of Penn and Teller)?
08:47:54 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	James Burke ~ Connections on PBS
08:48:27 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Also, “The Day the Universe Changed.”

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20231108

Update on Chip Manufacturing

10:28:27 From Judy & Mike Alexander To Everyone:
	FYI - Silicon Photonics, mentioned earlier, was invented locally, at the AF Research Lab group Hanscom AFB (RIP), by Richard Soref
10:48:28 From George Gamota To Everyone:
	how does industry support universities to provide the skilled workers?
11:17:41 From tedpk To Everyone:
	Hiding stuff is hard -- but still more reliable than "Open source" for the most critical technology

return

20231101

ChatGPT, part 3: How LLMs (Large Language Models) work

09:57:05 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	You also can’t share Covid, Flu, or Bad Breath.
10:07:14 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	Professor Dumbledore:  “Before I begin, I’d like to say a few words: Nitwit.  Blubber. Oddment.  Tweak.”
10:23:36 From Carl Lazarus To Everyone:
	Why 12,288 dimensions?  Why not more, why not fewer?
10:25:53 From tedpk To Everyone:
	The same concepts are being used all of the time by gmail -- but it never learns about "my style" -- a fundamental limitation on by design?
10:26:42 From Mark Edelman To Everyone:
	I wonder why the numbers in the vector have so many digits in them. Does this “precision” increase with training?
10:32:58 From Carl Lazarus To Everyone:
	# of dimensions = 3*2**12   was that just a choice of how much they could handle with some amount of computing power?
10:46:09 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	In Otter Speech-to-Text, sometimes Otter will go back and change an earlier word.  But GPT locks in a word once chosen, never going back to alter an earlier word.  Would that practice ever become an advance in these narrative language models?
10:48:28 From Carl Lazarus To Everyone:
	"The sky is blue".  Blue is a good choice after "The sky is" but "is" by itself doesn't particularly map to "blue".  So the whole of the sentence so far determines the probabilities for the next word, correct?  How long a sequence is considered?
10:55:02 From Carl Lazarus To Everyone:
	So far, this explains how ChatGPT can construct a reasonably sentence or even paragraph based on word relationships.  But how does it take into account the prompt you gave it?
11:20:10 From tedpk To Everyone:
	It is obvious that the human brain doesn't work in this manner -- we have lots of neurons -- but only a "relative few" are operating at one time [total power consumption is muc too low to work like GPT
11:24:36 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	«Bidirectional»
11:30:30 From John Howard To Everyone:
	How are the indexes of the various vectors computed?  They need to align to compute dot products.
11:55:40 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	Propagation of Misconceptions.

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20231025

ChatGPT Part 2: Just how smart is ChatGPT?

09:52:41 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	“How Smart is ChatGPT” ~ Red flags:  1) Anachronisms; 2) Internally inconsistent perspectives.
09:59:27 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	• HF: “Prompt Engineering”
10:00:48 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	• Socrates: “Prompt Engineering the name of the game” (even with humans).
10:03:23 From Carl Lazarus To Everyone:
	There was a recent news item about some method of "poisoning" images so chatbots would be badly disrupted if they scanned them.  Does anyone know more about this?
10:07:06 From Conor O'Mahony To Everyone:
	A new tool called Nightshade makes subtle changes to the pixels of an image—changes that are invisible to the human eye but trick machine-learning models into thinking the image depicts something different from what it actually does. When artists apply it to their work and those images are then hoovered up as training data, these “poisoned pixels” make their way into the AI model’s data set, and cause the model to malfunction. Images of dogs become cats, hats become toasters, cars become cows. The results are really impressive, and there is currently no known defense.	
	https://www.technologyreview.com/2023/10/23/1082189/data-poisoning-artists-fight-generative-ai/
10:08:11 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	Visual artists frequently construct synthetic images which are “unworldly” to arrest the attention of the viewer.  Such “unworldly” visual images can also confuse a synthetic image analyzer.  Optical illusions are commonplace examples, but other-worldly scenes are a staple of the visual arts.
10:29:55 From Jerome Slate To Everyone:
	Question on Digital Rights. How will ChatGPT access proprietary (digital) information, i.e., a copywritten digital textbook? Could ChatGPT "buy" one copy and then use that to answer queries without infringing on the copyright because it is using its own "words".
10:32:39 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	“Digital Rights” raises the question of what does it mean to “Publish” something (e.g. make the content available to the general public).
10:45:19 From larry freier To Everyone:
	can CHAT translate voice of 1 language to English
10:45:39 From Charles H Holbrow To Everyone:
        Can AI write AI software?
	Can AI design exams such as LSATs and MCATs/
10:45:49 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	What is the role of Carl Sagan’s “Baloney Detection Kit” or Joe Biden’s notion of “Malarkey” in assessing the validity of content culled from the Common Crawl, et al.
10:46:57 From tedpk To Everyone:
	The logarithmic scaling with CPU ops implies that the systems will be running into major roadblocks due to inefficient usage of computer tech
11:03:55 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	Are chatbots vulnerable or immune to nefarious “grooming”?
11:24:41 From Judy & Mike Alexander To Everyone:
	If one were to ask whether a human or animal is sentient, one would take *physical* measurements.  One would not simply engage the human in wordplay.
11:34:21 From tedpk To Everyone:
	Train the LLM on Bach and ask it to create -- see if it makes us a Beethoven's 9th
11:41:14 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	Ray Kurzweil pioneered the synthetic compositions of “elevator music” in the style of half a dozen musical genres based on statistical models of each genre.  Some of the genres were Jazz, Latin Jazz, Baroque, Classical, and Country.
11:45:33 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	Mozart and Bach (among others) developed  a statistical process called “Dice Music” in which musical motifs could be synthesized by rolling the dice and entering the values into a table that selected the next note in sequence.

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20231018

ChatGPT Part 1: Introducing ChatGPT

10:21:47 From Yvette Tenney To Everyone:
	Please repeat questions from audience. They're not always clearly heard.
10:36:36 From Yvette Tenney To Everyone:
	Can it create slides for the presentation?
10:49:27 From Drew King To Everyone:
	The cost for 4.0 is $20/month!
10:50:06 From David Kahan To Everyone:
	Question: What structural Analysis testing is available for standing trees to avoid city and town property damage during windy environments ?
10:53:26 From Drew King To Everyone:
	Bing chat is 4.0 today, and it's free, and it's connected to new web data. 
	My question: Why not just use MS Chat instead?
10:57:36 From Jerome Slate To Everyone:
	Why can't CHAT just say " I can't find any information on the "Great LLama Invasion"?
11:06:13 From Bob Primak To Everyone:
	Open Source ChatGPT projects do share their code and modeling innovations, but not the commercial versions.
11:08:17 From Bob Primak To Everyone:
	Misinformation tends to be drowned out by correct and less biased information. Probabilities don't respect the "echo chamber effect" -- in theory, at least.
11:29:39 From larry freier To Everyone:
	what does CHATGPT offer that googling an answer does?
11:30:21 From Jenny Richlin (she/her) To Everyone:
	How is Bing chat different from ChatGPT?
11:32:51 From Bob Melanson To Everyone:
	Has anyone done a comprehensive comparitive evaluation of the leading  generaive systems?
11:34:21 From Drew King To Everyone:
	Here is an advanced copy of parameters.
11:42:06 From Yvette Tenney To Everyone:
	What is "over fit"?
11:52:48 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	Henry Louis Gates.

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20230920

Modulus Arithmetic

11:08:32 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	This is basically “Clock” Arithmetic (where for our clocks, it’s Base 12).
11:17:01 From Steve Isenberg To Everyone:
	The number 2^100 is equal to 1,267,650,600,228,229,401,496,703,205,376. It has 30 digits in total.
	(Thanks, ChatGPT)
11:24:43 From Bob Primak To Everyone:
	Why are there 24 hours in a day?  https://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2011/11/15/3364432.htm#:~:text=Our%2024%2Dhour%20day%20comes,on%20the%20observations%20of%20stars.
11:25:38 From Bob Primak To Everyone:
	Our 24-hour day comes from the ancient Egyptians who divided day-time into 10 hours they measured with devices such as shadow clocks, and added a twilight hour at the beginning and another one at the end of the day-time, says [Dr. Nick] Lomb.
11:28:23 From Bob Primak To Everyone:
	Reflections on Chinese Numeration Systems: What Are Rod Numerals?  https://maa.org/book/export/html/3403381#:~:text=Reflections%20on%20Chinese%20Numeration%20Systems%3A%20What%20Are%20Rod%20Numerals%3F
11:30:39 From Judy & Mike Alexander To Everyone:
	ChatGPT is dependent on what it can find through internet lookup.  So t can't do mathematics, unless it's found, specifically, on the internet.
11:31:34 From Steve Isenberg To Everyone:
	I asked ChatGPT what is the remainder of 2^100 divided by 100.  Its first answer: 41, second answer: 76, third answer: 1.
11:46:53 From Bob Primak To Everyone:
	Acoustic Bikes: The New Name for Non-Electric Bikes? https://discerningcyclist.com/acoustic-bikes/

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20230913

11:26:55 From John Rudy To Everyone:
	who is the speaker?
11:27:45 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	Sabine Hossenfelder
11:29:34 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	Her YouTube Channel:  https://www.youtube.com/@SabineHossenfelder
11:29:34 From Steve Isenberg To Everyone:
	I think we have shown her videos before, or have them in the videos list.
11:29:43 From John Rudy To Everyone:
	Sabine Hossenfelder (born 1976) is a German professional YouTuber, theoretical physicist, science communicator, author, musician, and singer. She is the author of Lost in Math: How beauty leads physics astray, which explores the concept of elegance in fundamental physics and cosmology, and of Existential Physics: A scientist’s guide to life’s biggest questions.
11:30:04 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	She is one of the best presenters on YouTube and posts two videos a week.
11:30:50 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	And yes, she composes and performs song parodies, too.
11:31:52 From Steve Isenberg To Everyone:
	We have some of her videos on the list: #20, can we tell if there’s a wormhole in the Milky Way; #28, is the universe really a hologram
11:33:11 From Steve Isenberg To Everyone:
	https://www.iso-ne.com/isoexpress/web/charts
11:39:43 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	Maybe say a word or two on Flow Batteries.
11:43:05 From Larry Wittig To Everyone:
	Toyota has announce a solid-state battery that they claim will double the the range of lithium batteries. Scheduled for 2027.
11:53:30 From Bob Primak To Everyone:
	https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/engineering/flow-battery
	
	https://energy.mit.edu/news/flow-batteries-for-grid-scale-energy-storage/
11:53:55 From Bob Primak To Everyone:
	(articles about Flow Batteries)
11:54:03 From John Rudy To Everyone:
	lots of issues regarding mining of lithium

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20230906

10:29:58 From tedpk to Everyone:
	Will Douglas Heaven
	Senior Editor for AI
	MIT Technology Review
	Will Douglas Heaven is the senior editor for AI at MIT Technology Review, where he covers emerging trends and the people behind the tech. Previously, he was founding editor at the BBC tech-meets-geopolitics website Future Now and chief technology editor at New Scientist magazine. He has a PhD in computer science from Imperial College London and knows what it's like to work with robots.
10:33:53 From tedpk to Everyone:
	Making Robots Smarter, in Both Mind and Making Robots Smarter, in Both Mind and Body
	There is a symbiosis between robotics and AI where robotics allows AI to explore and experiment in tangible ways, providing an invaluable feedback loop that improves both technologies. We take an inside look at the commercial applications as well as R&D that can lead to new capabilities for robotics and AI.
	
	Marc Raibert
	Founder & Executive Director, Boston Dynamics AI InstituteBody
	There is a symbiosis between robotics and AI where robotics allows AI to explore and experiment in tangible ways, providing an invaluable feedback loop that improves both technologies. We take an inside look at the commercial applications as well as R&D that can lead to new capabilities for robotics and AI.
	
	Marc Raibert
	  Founder & Executive Director, Boston Dynamics AI Institute

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20230830

11:05:54 From Steve Isenberg To Everyone:
	First idea for Space Elevator comes from 1895 by Russian scientist Konstantin Tsiolkovsky.
11:14:08 From Bob Primak To Everyone:
	Part of the problem with troubleshooting errors made by AI bots (Peter A.) is that the AI "learning" process is not transparent -- it's like a "black box". Users don't get clues about how the triggers were tripped. (This is itself a safeguard against end-users learning how to "game" the AI.)
11:21:01 From Bob Primak To Everyone:
	Regarding Scientology, it is said that L. Ron Hubbard started the religion of Scientology as a joke.

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20230823

09:55:04 From Drew King To Everyone:
	https://tinyurl.com/VoicemeeterZoom
09:55:29 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	https://www.evernote.com/shard/s561/client/snv?isnewsnv=true&noteGuid=ccd400b9-6bab-d34a-bb74-dbe376efbd61&noteKey=db4ccb46c499bedafb4e840b602dca24&sn=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.evernote.com%2Fshard%2Fs561%2Fsh%2Fccd400b9-6bab-d34a-bb74-dbe376efbd61%2Fdb4ccb46c499bedafb4e840b602dca24&title=Voicemeeter%2Bfor%2BZoom
10:46:32 From Karin Y To Everyone:
	I beleive that the free Chat isn't trained on current information.
10:46:49 From Adam Broun To Everyone:
	Reacted to "I beleive that the f..." with 👍
10:48:05 From Bob Primak To Everyone:
	Chat GPT only runs through 2021.
10:50:13 From Adam Broun To Everyone:
	Pretty good article published today that talks about how ChatGPT evolved to its current state https://arstechnica.com/ai/2023/08/how-chatgpt-turned-generative-ai-into-an-anything-tool/
10:50:39 From Judy & Mike Alexander To Everyone:
	The original question is flawed because it asked a binary question.   If two people contributed, the answer could not attribute percentages of contributions.
10:53:15 From Drew King To Everyone:
	bing chat is based on chat gpt 4 and also uses bing to provide current information. There is an app too. You need to sign up for free. I use both for different purposes. I have accounts on all three big chat engines Google Bard microsoft Bing chat and chat gpt. it's very interesting using the very same text . To look at the different answers.
10:53:51 From Judy & Mike Alexander To Everyone:
	A cynical former boss of mine once told me that it's mor important to be lucky than to be good.
10:57:36 From Drew King To Everyone:
	Here is realtext file sent to you via chat.
	
	You can add files from Google Drive, or your PC.
11:33:15 From Steve Isenberg To Everyone:
	For info on LastPass and KeePass (my preference) and why to use complex passwords, see https://wiki.toku.us/doku.php?id=security_presentation
11:33:55 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	When I’m asleep in bed, I have very imaginative and creative dreams.

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20230816

10:15:30 From Bob Primak To Everyone:
	The modeling tools include creating a "point-cloud". I once did a talk about how this was done with Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris before the fire.
10:35:46 From Bob Primak To Everyone:
	Ted's video has frozen, visually.
10:55:48 From tedpk To Everyone:
	https://youtu.be/EQn2u9KFf8s
10:56:21 From tedpk To Everyone:
	https://youtu.be/wNSvDvNf1SA
11:00:17 From Bob Primak To Everyone:
	Peru's Amazon region has also been studied. A lot of new sites have been identified there and in Brazil.
11:02:12 From John Rudy To Everyone:
	there are many thousand unexploded bombs in Vietnam and the mid-east.  Can LIDAR pick up these bombs, at least those that are made of metal?
11:07:54 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	That was Hank Green on the Sci Show.
11:08:32 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	Hank and his brother, John Green are known as the VlogBrothers.
11:09:19 From tedpk To Everyone:
	https://youtu.be/LsIjwvM65zk
11:09:52 From Barry Kort To Everyone:
	Hank Green hosted a number of educational series on PBS Digital.
11:11:50 From tedpk To Everyone:
	https://youtu.be/LsIjwvM65zk
11:26:55 From Jerome Slate To Everyone:
	Were I in the military, I would want a quick-strike lidar capability to map any conflict area quickly. Thoughts?
11:28:00 From Bob Primak To Everyone:
	LiDAR is used by militaries and armed forces for a broad range of defense applications, such as battlefield mapping, determining line of sight, aiding in mine countermeasures and the autonomous navigation of military vehicles. https://www.defenseadvancement.com/suppliers/military-lidar/#:~:text=LiDAR%20is%20used%20by%20militaries,Target%20Tracking%20%26%20Detection
11:32:45 From Bob Primak To Everyone:
	Pompeii Still Has Buried Secrets https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/11/29/pompeii-still-has-buried-secrets

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20230809

10:11:28 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	You can follow along with the power-toys. https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/powertoys/
10:35:18 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Syncthing data usage stats: https://data.syncthing.net/
11:15:10 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	Rclone: https://rclone.org/

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20230802

10:29:58 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	How AI is trained can influence what it puts out. 
	
	Can artificial intelligence be racist?
	Experts say AI tools lack transparency and could cause disparities at an unprecedented level.
	https://www.yahoo.com/news/can-artificial-intelligence-be-racist-172952795.html
	
	Just noticed, and possibly relevant here.
10:43:11 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	What if the object is a helium-filled balloon
10:45:43 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	Chomsky inadvertantly *defined* "thinking" in his example.
10:56:48 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	The human brain is not operating the way this guy claims it operates.
10:58:51 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	Is it too simplistic a view he has?
11:04:50 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Yes, in terms of how the human brain actually works. It's much more complex than AI developers like to believe. There are no actual electrical circuits in the brain, for starters.
11:05:08 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	Imagine that Putin's people were able to "train" the Russian "Chat".  Or DeSantis's people training computers on American history.  The possibilities are troubling (to say the least).
11:05:28 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	I like some of Ted K.'s remarks.
11:12:32 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	If there is no gravity, then there is no atmosphere, either.  The gasses all drift away.
11:16:51 From Don Cooke 523 to Everyone:
	what would happen if I let go of a helium-filled balloon
	
	ChatGPT
	If you let go of a helium-filled balloon, it would behave quite differently than dropping an apple due to the physics of buoyancy and the properties of helium. Here's what would happen:
	
	Buoyancy: Helium is a gas that is lighter than air, which means it has a lower density than the surrounding air. When you release the helium-filled balloon, it experiences an upward force called buoyancy, which opposes the force of gravity.
	
	Ascending Motion: As a result of buoyancy, the helium-filled balloon would start to rise into the air. It will continue to ascend until the upward buoyant force is balanced by the downward force of gravity. During this ascent, the balloon may move vertically and might also drift horizontally due to wind currents.
	
	Constant Speed: Once the balloon reaches a certain altitude where the density of the surrounding air matches the density of the helium-filled balloon, it will stop accelerating and reach a point of constant speed.
11:19:22 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Summary: Model-Based Reasoning is as good as the precision and detail of the model one is relying on.
11:21:46 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	Very nice, Don
11:25:32 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Inflection Pi has a very interesting personality.

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20230726

10:09:29 From Carl Lazarus to Everyone:
	Is LI7 radioactive?
10:11:03 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Stable. https://www.americanelements.com/lithium-7-metal-isotope-13982-05-3#:~:text=Lithium%207%20Metal%20(Lithium%2D7,target%20materials%20and%20other%20applications.
10:51:17 From John Rudy to Everyone:
	Is there much pushback from anti-nuclear groups
10:54:00 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Why even environmentalists are supporting nuclear power today
	August 30, 2022 NPR https://www.npr.org/2022/08/30/1119904819/nuclear-power-environmentalists-california-germany-japan
10:54:33 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	So not nearly as much as one might suppose. Far less opposition than nuclear fission is still sparking.
10:57:00 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	The amount and "seriousness" of radioactive species in fusion are much smaller than in fission reactors.  In principle, much less of a waste problem than for fission reactors.

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20230719

10:11:36 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	https://setapp.com/how-to/full-list-of-all-macos-versions
10:12:22 From Jerome Slate to Everyone:
	Will Apple name it's next California location system "Homeless"?
10:15:22 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Sonoma.
10:21:59 From tedpk to Everyone:
	Who actually fabs' the processors and where? given all the issues relevant to Taiwan and China?
10:24:41 From Drew King to Everyone:
	When purchasing M1/M2 are there any software that needed to be updated such as VM software like VirtualBox?
11:34:13 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	There is a site called https://legacyupdate.net/ for keeping Windows 7 updated. Free and it works well.
11:35:47 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	https://wiki.toku.us/doku.php?id=windows_annoyances
11:37:42 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	BelArc Advisor
11:37:48 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	https://www.belarc.com/products/belarc-advisor
11:41:56 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Ventoy

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20230712

10:24:56 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	James Bardeen and John Bardeen (transistor, superconductivity) are different persons.  Is James John's son?
10:25:38 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Parents: John Bardeen
10:25:58 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	per Google Search for James Bardeen
10:30:38 From tedpk to Everyone:
	https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WuYpI3EoCnM
10:41:40 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	If photons are in orbit around a black hole, as stated in the video, classical physics says they should radiate … right?  Is a quantum theory required?
10:48:29 From John Howard to Everyone:
	I think it's electrons, not photons, that radiate when deflected.
10:49:07 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Individual photons are the smallest (“quantum”) unit of radiation and cannot divide into any smaller units. They _are_ the radiation, all self-contained in one photon.
10:49:21 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Reacted to "I think it's electro..." with 👍🏼
10:52:22 From Chuck Kaufman to Everyone:
	that's nanohertz
10:54:19 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	John Howard - You're right.  I wasn't really alert.
11:08:21 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Reacted to "John Howard - You're..." with 👍🏼

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20230628

11:05:56 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Bob Ballard did an 18-minute TED Talk in 2014 on Deep Sea Exploration.
	
	Robert Ballard: The astonishing hidden world of the deep ocean
	
	TED
	https://ted.com › talks › robert_ballard_the_astonishing_...
	
	17:59
	Ocean explorer Robert Ballard takes us on a mindbending trip to hidden worlds underwater, where he and other researchers are finding unexpected life, ...
	TED · Mar 22, 2014
11:06:31 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	https://ted.com/talks/robert_ballard_the_astonishing_hidden_world_of_the_deep_ocean?language=en

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20230621

10:23:21 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	On the current slide, Item F. has an error. It has too many zeros in 3 million. As written, it reads 3 Billion.
10:24:39 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Hold on! b.p. is Base Pairs. This is correct!
10:33:55 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Neanderthal to human similarities are ca. 2% on the average. But this differs form one region to another.
10:34:42 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	From region to region, the percentage is about 1% to 3% neanderthal. I haven't seen figures for Denisovan genetics in Asian populations.
10:40:52 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Osteoarthritis  -- Is this really due to autoimmune reactions? I thought that was one theory in rheumatoid arthritis, not osteoarthritis?
10:44:39 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	The brains overall of Neanderthals was larger than modern humans. But the frontal and prefrontal lobes are much larger in modern humans than in Neanderthals or Denisovans.

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20230614

10:14:55 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	There are ways not to use a Microsoft Account for Windows 11 Home setup and logins. But let's not get into this today.
10:17:32 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Surface has a Boot Configuration Log in the BIOS. This is not TPM2 Boot Security, which has a MOK Key Option. Ventoy is run with Win 11 TPM security enabled if the MOK Key is injected via a special Ventoy routine during its first run. From then onward, it will boot as a USB boot device. I have not tested this on any MS Surface.
10:31:17 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	The File Explorer Tabbed View update was Oct. 2022, not Oct 2023. Oct. 2023 has not happened yet.
10:50:06 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	What Ted was talking about were not browser notifications. They were Windows Notifications, including the News and Weather notifications. These are not governed by the browser.
10:51:45 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Windows Shake to minimize -- this has been around since Windows 10.
10:52:21 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	But the feature may have been updated in Windows 11.
10:53:52 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	F5 for Notepad timestamp has been around since Windows 95.
10:54:16 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Notepad Tabs Feature is new in Win 11.
10:57:50 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Windows 11 Shake to Minimize was known as Aero Shake in Windows 10.

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20230524

10:37:28 From tedpk to Everyone:
	You still need all  of the deep mechanical drilling tool handling -- that's the derricks and the mechanical "pipe" handling
10:39:38 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	If you read the recommended article in the MIT journal, this is not as big a problem for Direct Energy Drilling as for conventional mechanical drilling rigs. But there is a need for some of this equipment and management, except for no casings to handle at the surface.
10:40:46 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	That is, no physical casings. Just wave guides.
10:41:28 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	The MIT article: https://news.mit.edu/2022/quaise-energy-geothermal-0628
10:54:36 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	"test chambe" -- definitely MIT! (Boston accent)

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20230517

10:09:31 From Bob Melanson to Everyone:
	Do they know what caused the fire?
10:10:00 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	It was believed either an electrical fault in the roof, or else a cigarette discarded by a worker.
10:14:28 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	«We still don’t know how the fire started.»
10:14:44 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	True, officially...
10:16:57 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Timber support trusses are thought to have been used in the original construction of many cathedrals.
10:22:53 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	France does not have big enough trees to replace Notre Dame's medieval beams  https://www.ctvnews.ca/world/france-does-not-have-big-enough-trees-to-replace-notre-dame-s-medieval-beams-1.4382570
10:24:09 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	The spire was built originally using timber which began green. This means using only trees with very straight grain.
10:26:08 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Forest management means selectively cutting a small number of trees in a cycle spanning several to many years. Weston, MA was managing their Town Forests until the 1980's, I'm told. This practice is totally sustainable, and does not harm the overall health of the remaining forest.
10:29:57 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	The Spire was not original to Notre Dame Cathedral. it was added during a renovation in 1859.
10:31:32 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Iron supports and staples were used in other cathdrals as well. Amiens even used an "iron chain" all the way around the main structure to stabilize it.
10:32:54 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	(Amiens was buitlo later than Notre Dame.)
10:33:01 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	built
11:16:15 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	For what it’s worth, ChatGPT says this:  The French government has owned Notre-Dame Cathedral since the French Revolution. The cathedral, along with all other churches in France, was confiscated by the state during the French Revolution in the late 18th century.
	
	However, a significant legal change happened with the 1905 French law on the Separation of the Churches and the State. After this law, the French government owned the cathedral, and the Catholic Church was granted exclusive rights to use it for religious purposes. The Archbishop of Paris is responsible for its use and maintenance, and the French state covers all renovation and restoration costs.
	
	It's important to note that the Vatican never really had legal ownership of Notre-Dame Cathedral. Before the French Revolution, the cathedral was owned by the Catholic Church in a broad sense, but the Vatican as an entity didn't have direct ownership.
11:20:05 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Google Bard says this:  The Vatican never ceded legal ownership of Notre Dame Cathedral to the Government of France. The cathedral is a national monument of France and is owned by the French state. The Vatican has always had a close relationship with Notre Dame, and the Pope often visits the cathedral during his trips to France. However, the Vatican has never had any legal claim to the cathedral.
	
	The confusion may have arisen from the fact that the Vatican was involved in the restoration of Notre Dame after it was damaged in a fire in 2019. The Vatican donated $10 million to the restoration effort, and Pope Francis sent a team of experts to help with the repairs. However, this does not mean that the Vatican now owns the cathedral. The Vatican's donation was simply a gesture of goodwill and support for the French people.

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20230503

10:38:43 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	Realistic paintings existed under Rome.  They can be seen in the villas that were covered in ash by the Vesuvius eruption, and now are "exhumed"..
10:43:40 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Eureka from the Great Seal of CA. (This relates to the discovery of gold at Sutter's Mill. The finders are said to have exclaimed "Eureka!" when they found the gold.)
11:15:19 From Stephen Quatrano to Everyone:
	Three Sisters in Oregon!
11:15:24 From Stephen Quatrano to Everyone:
	Great shot
11:16:24 From Stephen Quatrano to Everyone:
	The Red Baloon
11:23:08 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Ice cubes used in drinks contain air, so they float higher than natural icebergs in sea water.
11:24:28 From Stephen Quatrano to Everyone:
	So what you’re saying is that the story of Archimedes is just the tip of the iceberg.  Right?  There
11:24:51 From Stephen Quatrano to Everyone:
	There’s a lot more to the story…
11:25:21 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Yeah 🙂

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20230419

10:22:33 From larry freier to Everyone:
	How was Einstein's brain different from other peoples?
10:24:56 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	It wasn't, as far as has so far been published.
10:36:32 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Einstein had a fourth gyrus (ridge) in the left frontal cortex which only about 10% of the human population have. Neuroscientist Dean Falk hypothesized that this extra gyrus hosted the kind of systems thinking that Einstein was gifted at. You can look up the literature on Dean Falk and her analysis of Einstein's brain.  PBS Nova aired an episode on it with host David Pogue (who also has that uncommon 4th gyrus).
10:37:25 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	OK.
10:38:43 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Try this Google Search:   https://www.google.com/search?q=Dean+Falk+Einstein%27s+Brain+PBS+Nova+with+host+David+Pogue
10:40:19 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Thanks.
10:44:08 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	If you can find that episode of PBS Nova (online or DVD), maybe schedule it for a future session here.
10:55:40 From John Rudy to Everyone:
	there is a wonderful book about a cross country trip carrying a box with Einstein's brain
10:56:01 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	It turns out, people see "faces" where there are none. This has offered clues about how strong our brain organization is in shaping our perceptioons of our world.
10:56:32 From John Rudy to Everyone:
	book called Driving Mr Albert
10:56:40 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	Such as finding faces in clouds, smoke images on walls (“I see Jesus!), etc
10:56:47 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Interesting about neural networks not possessing such strong residual perceptions, including networks not recognizing stick-figures as people.
10:57:15 From John Rudy to Everyone:
	Bob- see the book The Man who mistook his wife for a hat
10:57:21 From John Rudy to Everyone:
	Oliver Sachs
10:57:28 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Pareidolia ~ Seeing faces.
10:57:37 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	She is only covering perceptions; how does brain change when moods change?
10:57:52 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	My Dad was fascinated by that book. He had some difficulty processing faces and connecting them to people, even in his youth.
10:58:14 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	That's also an issue with some of us with autistic disorders.
10:59:15 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Prosopagnosia ~ Oliver Sacks' “Face Blindness”
10:59:29 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Nancy is right about autistic people having issues with scanning equipment.
11:00:26 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	The structures and basic functions may not look different. the frontal and prefrontal areas are thought to be more strongly associated with autism, especially higher-functioning ASD people.
11:00:43 From John Rudy to Everyone:
	I didn't think I had claustrophobia but was in one of these test systems and had to spend 30 minutes and I couldn't do it
11:01:42 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	British neuroscientist, Simon Baron-Cohen proposes changing the name of “High-Functioning Autism” to “Systemizers" ~ people who are good at Systems Thinking.
11:02:26 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	I'd be as careful about limiting the Spectrum as I would be about extending the Spectrum until almost everyone is autistic.
11:03:24 From John Rudy to Everyone:
	We learned from Hans Lucas Teuber that people with brain damage trained other portions of their brain to take over
11:03:57 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Some areas can be replicated, but not all. The results are never as good as the original organization of the brain.
11:04:09 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	How about those who can remember every detail about their life
11:04:17 From John Rudy to Everyone:
	Teuber looked at war wounds
11:05:29 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Eidetic individuals have never been found to have unique brain organization. But clearly they have some sort of functional advantages.
11:06:11 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	One problem with the name ‘Autism" is that Freud originally proposed to call it “Autoerotism" but Eugen Bleuler balked at that name, and shortened it to ‘Autism.” An alternative name was “Ipsism" which you might want to rule out for similar considerations.
11:07:27 From John Rudy to Everyone:
	I have to leave
11:07:55 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Freud had a lot to say about eroticisms.
11:19:11 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Mood has a valence attached to a stimulus ~ Appetitive vs Aversive ~ wanting more of the stimulus (approach) or wanting less (avoid).
11:22:03 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Regarding mood, a “neurosis" arises when you have mixed feelings. Part of you is curious, fascinated, and intrigued, but another part of you is apprehensive.
11:24:19 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	While an MRI scan allows doctors to examine a patient’s organs, tissue, or bones, “an fMRI looks at the function of the brain,” Dr. Zucconi explains.
	https://www.yalemedicine.org/conditions/functional-mri-imaging-the-brain#:~:text=While%20an%20MRI%20scan%20allows,Zucconi%20explains.
11:27:41 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	I would get headaches when working on seemingly intractable problems that needed to be solved.
11:29:28 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	I got scintillations during a very stressful passage of life, some 35 years ago.

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20230412

10:31:40 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	I have a Premium account on ChatGPT and at the moment I am getting this message: “ChatGPT is at capacity right now,”
10:32:15 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Google has ‘Bard’.  OpenAI has ChatGPT.
10:33:35 From John Rudy to Everyone:
	"I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that."
10:36:08 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	• Write a poem about the status of ChatGPT.
	ChatGPT, oh ChatGPT
	With AI so smart
	But alas, it’s at capacity
	Leaving us to wait
	For a chance to chat
	With its wisdom and wit
	We long to be part
	Of its conversation
	But for now, we sit
	On the sidelines
	Patiently waiting
	For the day
	When ChatGPT
	Is ready to play
	Again.
10:39:35 From Carl Lazarus to Everyone:
	I have Bing with AI.  I used it to find things for visiting grandkids to do in the Boston area.
10:40:30 From John Rudy to Everyone:
	my granddaughter had a group college project to convert a piece of a play written in 1300 to modern speech and subject.  They used CHAT to get some ideas though they understood they couldn't turn in what was created.  It understood old English
10:43:09 From Drew King to Everyone:
	Bing chat has newer data than chatgpt
11:06:01 From John Rudy to Everyone:
	HAL: I am putting myself to the fullest possible use, which is all I think that any conscious entity can ever hope to do.
11:46:02 From Drew King to Everyone:
	https://meshnet.nordvpn.com
	https://nordvpn.com/meshnet

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20230405

10:05:04 From Ted Kochanski to Everyone:
	If the Hubble ST is just Hubble -- why isn't JWST -- just Webb
10:09:43 From Harry Forsdick to Everyone:
	If it takes 8 minutes for light to get from the Sun to the earth, why does it take approx 20 min for radio to get from Mars to earth?  Does light travel faster than radio?
10:11:16 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	It depends on whether Mars is on the same side of the sun as the Earth, or diametrically opposite.
10:11:35 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	From Quora: The distance of Mars from Earth varies while they are orbiting Sun.The shortest distance is 34.6 million miles when Mars is 3.09 light minutes away and longest distance is 250 million miles when Mars is 22.36 light minutes away.On average Mars is 12.72 light minutes away.Two way telephone communication time from Mars to earth on their shortest distance is 6.18 minutes and on their longest distance is 44.72 minutes.
10:15:45 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	I don't understand why Scott Kenyon talks about colors in the JWST images.  They are false colors, put in by NASA.
10:16:16 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	To simplify about Mars:
10:16:40 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	To simplify about Mars:At solar conjunction, Mars is as far away as it can be from Earth, at nearly 249.1 million miles.
	That's twice or more the distance from Earth to the Sun (93 million miles). At the closest approach, Mars is only 36 million miles from Earth, making it a much shorter trip for the radio waves. So that 20 min. figure varies depending on where Earth and Mars are relative to one another. Also, remember, there is processing time for the signals, and the entire transmission is not a single radio wave pulse. That 20 mins is for the entire image to arrive, not the first radio pulses.
10:18:01 From Ted Kochanski to Everyone:
	if the Milkyway is forming a few stars per year -- on the average with Orion having a few thousand or more "new" stars --and  we had assumed that places like Orion formed a lot of stars at once -- is this still an operative model?
10:18:12 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	If Steve's source is correct, 20 mins would be round-trip time at about half the longest possible Earth-Mars distance.

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20230329

10:22:33 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	As a teenager I was in Iowa and actually saw the formation of a tornado overhead. It was scary, but AWESOME!!
10:29:26 From tedpk to Everyone:
	In the past the National Severe Predictions relied on actual observations to call a Warning --- now there seems to be quite a bit of Warnings called based on Radar?
10:33:55 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	"Centrifugal" balance. Actually, this has to be based on centripetal force and angular momentum, as centrifugal force is a fictious force.
10:42:33 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	fictitious force in above comment
10:44:36 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	Feynman Lectures in Physics:  Feynman argues that centrifugal force is *real*.\
10:45:03 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Interesting, I'll have to give that a look somwetime...
10:49:59 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Feynman Lectures in Physics:  Feynman argues that centrifugal force is *real*.\ 
	
	The centrifugal force is very real if you are in a rotating reference frame. It causes objects in a rotating frame of reference to accelerate away from the center of rotation. Washing machines, uranium enrichment centrifuges, and biology lab centrifuges all depend on the reality of the centrifugal force .
	
	(Feynman's perspective)
	https://www.wtamu.edu/~cbaird/sq/2012/12/15/why-is-the-centrifugal-force-talked-about-so-much-if-its-not-real
11:08:09 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	Is USA the only place in the world where there are tornadoes?  Do tornadoes form in other places — Europe, Asia, Australia, S America?
11:09:28 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	Has there been investigations into ways to stop or minimize tornadoes, like: Microwaves to apply heat, or other ideas?
11:10:38 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Has cloud seeding been tried to mitigate supercells?
11:17:35 From tedpk to Everyone:
	can you comment on the damage due to: tornados [particularly low F number], straight line winds and microbursts
11:28:44 From tedpk to Everyone:
	How about Hurricane triggered or spawned tornados -- the tornado can sometimes be far from the hurricane's center of circulation
11:37:29 From tedpk to Everyone:
	What about "sacrificial drones"

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20230308

	Is the electron directionality seen in the Stern Gerlach experiment the same at the North Pole and the Equator?
10:50:10 From tedpk to Everyone:
	in 1987 my brother supervised by Prof Greytak trapped neutral hydrogen atoms in a magnetic field
11:03:14 From Justin Tse to Everyone:
	So, because the two particles have the same and opposite spin orientation at time T1 and then the same at time T2 (when separated), this is a type of "memory" of prior more local entanglement?
11:11:52 From Carl Lazarus to Everyone:
	How do you create an entangled pair of photons or electrons?
11:14:40 From Mark Edelman to Everyone:
	A rather broad question: are you satisfied with a conventional definition of information, as valid in the context of entanglement across distances? Is there any reason to see information differently?
11:17:54 From Mark Edelman to Everyone:
	How does one KNOW that two particles are still entangled?
11:19:26 From tedpk to Everyone:
	in my brother's work spin-polarized hydrogen was trapped in a magnetic field --if you turned off the trapping field --would you get entangled hydrogen "en-masse"?
11:21:18 From Harry Forsdick to Everyone:
	Dr, Zwierlein:  I think it would be great to hear you talk about what is going on currently in your lab.  I think it would be good to wait a little bit for us to absorb what you said today until you would explain what is currently going on in your group.
11:23:36 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	In frequency doubling, where high irradiation produces two photons, the photons are correlated.  That's fairly common in nonlinear optics.
11:29:10 From Bob Melanson to Everyone:
	Is it possible to disentangle two particles entangled "close" together in time and space?  Then, Is it possible to entangle two particles at a distance?  Then, Can these particles be disentangled?
11:33:43 From Larry Wittig to Everyone:
	can multiple photon/electrons be entangled to eack other
11:37:10 From tedpk to Everyone:
	Magnetic trapping of spin-polarized atomic hydrogen
	Harald F. Hess, Greg P. Kochanski, John M. Doyle, Naoto Masuhara, Daniel Kleppner, and Thomas J. Greytak
	Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 672 – Published 10 August 1987
11:38:04 From Mark Edelman to Everyone:
	So the next question would be: can you have multiple different types of entanglement of the same particles? And can just one disentanglement occur then?
11:39:26 From Tony Galaitsis to Everyone:
	If you “measure” the properties of particle 1 in World 1, how do you know where “World 2” is?
11:41:25 From tedpk to Everyone:
	can you comment on the MIT, et al Bell's Test using Quasars
11:50:12 From tedpk to Everyone:
	how about gravitational waves and entanglement of photons?

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20230301

11:26:14 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	The video we “watched” is at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j6PbonHsqW0
11:34:09 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Ads and notifications in Windows 11 -- How to control:
	
	https://www.windowscentral.com/software-apps/windows-11/how-to-disable-annoying-ads-on-windows-11
	
	https://www.pcmag.com/how-to/how-to-remove-annoying-ads-from-windows-11
11:44:40 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLROBLlvnR7BEF9b1NOvRf_zhboibmywJb

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20230215

10:21:01 From Jerome Slate to Everyone:
	Does AI require clear, defined goals?  e.g., a sixteen year-old asks "what college should I apply to?"
10:27:58 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	Can computers distinguish between coyotes/wolves and dogs (German Shepherds, e.g.)?
10:30:06 From tedpk to Everyone:
	There has to be a distinction made between "abstract" and "real" types of "object" -- in the former the boundaries are defined by well defined rules, in the latter the "Platonic Dialogue of the Cave is central"
10:33:08 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	the hiring example probable contravenes diversity in hiring.  Non-ideologically, it will miss "different" candidates who can bring something new to the organization.
10:45:37 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	Was Zillow's debacle a GIGO problem?
10:47:13 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	No. the data were not flawed or inappropriate.
10:47:41 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	It was COVID which was an unpredictable monkey-wrench thrown into the model.
10:48:46 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	… which is one form of GIGO
10:49:48 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	GIGO as I understand it relates to the data set not being appropriate. Maybe there's something about changing conditions making the data into garbage? I don't get that.
10:53:03 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Both creative "geniuses" and AI algorithms can be fatally flawed, so neither paradigm is a good, sustainable business model. "Celebrity Designers" have a very uneven track record in the fashion industry.
11:11:46 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Who gets reported as a child abuser is also a function of which communities are willing to do the reporting.
11:15:39 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Automating a biased process only reinforces the bias.
11:15:55 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	The Allegheny case is one of asking the *wrong* question, not just "bias".
11:16:28 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	They had all the answers, it was the questions they got wrong.
11:17:07 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	That is, I\Allegheny County assumed that the number of calls would reflect the occurrence or severity of child abuse.
11:19:21 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	ChatGPT gave a computer user group an interesting experience with ChatGPT. IT told us that our organization disbanded in 2012!
11:19:30 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	It, not IT.
11:33:50 From Adam Broun to Everyone:
	https://jaykmody.com/blog/gpt-from-scratch/

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20230208

10:10:01 From tedpk to Everyone:
	anything about Parker Solar Probe?
10:12:05 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	It is true that the Apollo Engineering Drawings were lost or discarded.
10:15:48 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Correction -- NOT true. There was hardware not preserved, but the blueprints are still available online. https://www.quora.com/Did-NASA-lose-the-blueprint-plans-for-the-Apollo-spacecraft-How-and-why-What-about-some-of-the-the-videos-or-photos-of-the-Apollo-missions-Again-how-or-why
10:17:34 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Also, some of the backup recorded tapes were not preserved. Today's video enhancement technology might have been able to extract useful images from these backup tapes, but they are gone.
10:23:57 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Those were more than video. They were 14-track tape, which included telemetry data. Most likely they were erased and reused. https://www.nasa.gov/feature/not-unsolved-mysteries-the-lost-apollo-11-tapes
11:05:29 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	SpaceX pricing and performance (speed) have been severely criticized by people who have tried the system so far.
11:07:13 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	The large number of satellites "up there" have, apparently, brightened the night sky, messing, among other things, with terrestrial astronomy.
11:09:39 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Not to mention contributing to overcrowding of LEO where Starlink is filling up available orbits.
11:10:33 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Early tests of Starlink latency have not been very impressive. But there is great potential in the system
11:16:28 From Larry Wittig to Everyone:
	Hollow core fiber optic cables transmit at very close to the speed of light.
11:27:08 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	UAP -- Unidentified Aerial Phenomena.
11:27:55 From Carl Lazarus to Everyone:
	Maybe they are Chinese balloons.
11:28:33 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	That farmer's photo is a known fake.
11:40:07 From Umesh Shelat to Everyone:
	Was his George’s father named Noah?

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20230201

10:08:03 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Here is the blog post on Crypto-Currencies that I posted nearly a decade ago ~ http://moultonlava.blogspot.com/2013/11/mathematically-defined-crypto-currencies.html
10:11:14 From tedpk to Everyone:
	can you distinguish Bitcoin, Ethereum, etc from the Stable Coins such as DST, etc.
10:11:55 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	…… not beholden to government" :  Sounds like banking before the Federal Reserve system was created, Depression-era banking laws, ...
10:17:45 From Jerome Slate to Everyone:
	What is the purpose of mining coins for the cryptocurrency itself? Is it like the Federal Reserve printing money?
10:19:22 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	Re: mining Bitcoin.  Yes. You are printing money (if you are lucky and are the first to “find a solution”)
10:19:56 From tedpk to Everyone:
	can you distinguish open and closed blockchain [e.g. IBM]
10:20:18 From Jerome Slate to Everyone:
	I understand how it helps the miner. How does it help the currency. When the Fed prints money, it debases the currency.
10:21:24 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	Earning bitcoin by a successful “solution” is a reward for finding that solution.  This is not an issue for now, as the limit on number of bitcoin has not been reached.
10:22:16 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	My stepson owns bitcoin that he earned from the efforts of his mining computers.
10:23:01 From Jerome Slate to Everyone:
	Does not answer my question. The question is on the benefit to the cryptocurrency, NOT the miner.
10:24:24 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	When he earns bitcoin, it has no effect on the price of the bitcoin currency.
10:31:16 From Larry Wittig to Everyone:
	Now folks that lost bitcoin value are suing celebrities who recommended buying them.
10:36:28 From Larry Wittig to Everyone:
	Paul krugman (nyt economist) callls bitcoins a self occurring ponzi scheme with no useful purpose except to launder money.
10:37:23 From tedpk to Everyone:
	if you put $1,000 into Amazon about 20 years ago ==> you are a millionaire today
10:47:14 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	To explore Bitcoin Blockchain (and also other cryptos) visit https://www.blockchain.com/explorer/assets/btc — this is what Bob was showing earlier.
10:51:29 From tedpk to Everyone:
	Trust, but verify (Russian: Доверяй, но проверяй, tr. Doveryay, no proveryay, IPA: [dəvʲɪˈrʲæj no prəvʲɪˈrʲæj])
10:51:29 From Larry Wittig to Everyone:
	Please comment on if taxes are due on crypo earnings.
10:55:25 From Steve Isenberg to Everyone:
	There is a machine (like a candy machine) in Burlington Mall that you can buy/sell Bitcoin.
11:05:16 From tedpk to Everyone:
	These things can happen on the Alberta Exchange for Junior Capital Pools -- originally used to fund mining or drilling
11:12:35 From tedpk to Everyone:
	you miss ID'd the SNP & Coins
11:15:53 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	If you want to make an analogy for Bitcoin et al., it might be "investing" in real currencies (dollars,pounds, etc.)
11:25:30 From Jerome Slate to Everyone:
	Old expression: "A fool and his money are soon parted."      Plus ca change, plus c'est la meme chose.

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20230125

10:27:32 From Jerome Slate to Everyone:
	Will gravity pull light that is approaching, thus increasing its speed?
10:33:14 From Larry Wittig to Everyone:
	Are thercase where a black hole causes the lensings and you get a ring without the bright center?
10:48:55 From Adam Broun to Everyone:
	Does gravitational lensing produce any chromatic dispersion? (i.e. different effective refraction for different light wavelengths)?
11:01:31 From tedpk:
	“Morphology of gravitationally lensed galaxies”, 
	J. A. Tyson, G. Kochanski, I. Dell’Antonio; 
	The UV Universe at Low and High Redshift, October 1997, AIP press.
11:21:33 From Jerome Slate to Everyone:
	Name:  Einstein Ring, Hon.
11:24:25 From Tony Galaitsis to Everyone:
	Question about separated source-lens objects…
11:25:58 From Ken Cutter to Everyone:
	can a "normal" image of the source be constructed from the rings?

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20230111

07:19:37 From tedpk to Everyone:
	Do you have a 'Hall of Fame"?  for your historical figures
07:20:11 From tedpk to Everyone:
	Where is Marie Curie?
07:22:01 From tedpk to Everyone:
	She had to overcome more than most anyone ever to get where she got and then --  she got to the very top
07:25:02 From tedpk to Everyone:
	What is the distribution between Theory and  Experiment?
07:32:22 From tedpk to Everyone:
	Ada
07:32:37 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Yes. Ada Lovelace.
07:32:45 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	Ada Lovelace, to be exact.
07:35:18 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	IBM-style punch cards came long after the Analytical Engine.  See Hollerith.
07:37:42 From Carl Lazarus to Everyone:
	Ada had the insight that numbers in a computer could be used to represent any kind of non-numeric information, such as text or music.
07:40:08 From tedpk to Everyone:
	Jaquard Weaving Engine  -- was the source of the use of cards?
07:40:36 From Carl Lazarus to Everyone:
	I believe so.
07:43:17 From Bob Primak to Everyone:
	The Jacquard Looms used belts made of leather, with holes punched in them to create patterns in the weaving. This differs form programming more general=purpose computers, and it was not a direct source of modern computer punch cards.
07:45:43 From tedpk to Everyone:
	A number of years ago I wrote an editorial for the IEEE Boston Section -- There seems to be a bias to "lack of hands-on"
07:47:34 From tedpk to Everyone:
	Somewhat later I travelled to India presenting a workshop on Computer Engineering using PSOC tech -- there were many women but almost all had never handled a piece of computer hardware
07:52:02 From Dan Silber to Everyone:
	In 1969, I had a summer job supporting a computer programming group for a major insurance company in New York City. I was surprised to find it was mostly women, but I figured it was because it was a new field, unencumbered with the traditions of civil or mechanical engineering.
07:54:07 From Harry Forsdick to Everyone:
	Please confine your comments and questions to the chat.  We will make sure they get asked if they are relevant.
08:01:02 From Judy & Mike Alexander to Everyone:
	Science of cooking actually is a rather old idea.  My mother-in-law was a home ec major at Simmons College (graduated around 1941).  Her course of study had quite a lot of emphasis on the chemistry that occurs during cooking.
08:24:36 From Harry Forsdick to Everyone:
	To those who arrived after the meeting began please realize that the video projector that belongs to the LexCC is not working today.  Since we can’t control the computers all of the equipment that picks up sound is not working today.
08:25:59 From tedpk to Everyone:
	Karen Paneta @ Tufts?
08:29:42 From Barry Kort to Everyone:
	Also, have you done anything with Rosalind Picard (Affective Computing) at the MIT Media Lab?

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2023lctgmeetingchats.txt · Last modified: 2024.01.10 11:43 by Steve Isenberg